Microsoft’s Role in WannaCry

Sam Biddle wrote for the Intercept on the recent WannaCry malware disaster. According to Sam, it’s not possible to name a single culprit for what happened, but militarism and greed are the two main forces at play here.  This bit stood out to me:

Microsoft also did not create WannaCry. But it did create something something nearly as bad: Windows Vista, an operating system so horrendously bloated, broken, and altogether unpleasant to use that many PC users back in 2007 skipped upgrading altogether, opting instead to stick with the outdated Windows XP, a decision that has left many people on that decade-and-a-half-old operating system even today, years after Microsoft stopped updating it.

I recommend reading the full original article here: https://theintercept.com/2017/05/16/the-real-roots-of-the-worldwide-ransomware-outbreak-militarism-and-greed/

Good For The EU, But

Some very sad conclusions regarding Brexit by analysts working for Algebris Investments on the World Economic Forum website.

Brexit is a symptom of Britain’s deeply rooted economic imbalances: a growth model too concentrated on finance and services and dependent on foreign goods, human and financial capital; record-high social and wealth inequality; a lack of investment in infrastructure and education; and monetary and fiscal policies that have helped create a property bubble and excess household debt.

In their attempt to create a fairer and more equal country, Britons sought to sever ties from what they saw as a weakened partner. The reality is that Brexit will likely make Britain weaker and, ironically, is making the EU stronger.

I recommend reading the full article here: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/04/brexit-european-union-negotiations/

Jeremy Keith nails it again, on progressive web apps

There seems to be an inherent assumption that native is intrinsically “better” than the web, and that the only way that the web can “win” is to match native apps note for note. But that misses out on all the things that only the web can do—instant distribution, low-friction sharing, and the ability to link to any other resource on the web (and be linked to in turn). Turning our beautifully-networked nodes into standalone silos just because that’s the way that native apps have to work feels like the cure that kills the patient.

Full post: https://adactio.com/journal/11130
Posted in Web

Jeremy Keith on “Regressive Web Apps”

My favourite champion of the “One Web” Jeremy Keith wrote a really good post last week, triggered by the recent Google I/O conference and the (unfortunate, in my opinion) trend toward trying to make web apps behave like native apps and considering that “best practice”.

I recommend reading the whole article (and following his blog), but I love this quote:

I’ve seen people use a meta viewport declaration to disable pinch-zooming on their sites. As justification they point to the fact that you can’t pinch-zoom in most native apps, therefore this web-based app should also prohibit that action. The inability to pinch-zoom in native apps is a bug. By also removing that functionality from web products, people are reproducing unnecessary bugs.

Source: Adactio: Journal—Regressive Web Apps

Posted in Web